Jack O'Brien Steps in as Broadway's All My Sons Director, Replacing Gregory Mosher After Casting Dispute

Broadway News   Jack O'Brien Steps in as Broadway's All My Sons Director, Replacing Gregory Mosher After Casting Dispute
 
The Roundabout Theatre Company production, starring Annette Bening and Tracy Letts, will open in April 2019.
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Jack O’Brien Joseph Marzullo/WENN

Following a disagreement over casting between Gregory Mosher and the estate of Arthur Miller, the director has withdrawn from the upcoming Broadway revival of Miller's All My Sons. The Roundabout Theatre Company production, starring Annette Bening and Tracy Letts, is still scheduled to begin April 4, 2019, at the American Airlines Theatre, where it will open April 22.

Annette Bening and Tracy Letts
Annette Bening and Tracy Letts John Rou/Jim Luning

Stepping in for Mosher is Tony winner Jack O'Brien, most recently represented on Broadway with the revival of Carousel.

Roundabout CEO and Artistic Director Todd Haimes states that Mosher and the Miller estate "did not ultimately share the same vision" on how to effectively assemble a diverse company for the production. "They couldn't agree on the specific casting choices that would lead to the richest-possible All My Sons for 2019," he explained.

Though a representative for Roundabout declined to comment further on the exact dispute that led to Mosher's departure, the Washington Post reports that the director intended to cast two black actors as Ann and George Deever, a decision to which the playwright's daughter, Rebecca Miller, objected.

Miller's plays, exploring the fall of the American Dream, are often presented with diverse or multiracial casts. Rachel Chavkin will direct a production of The American Clock at London's Old Vic with multiple performers playing each member of the Baum household. Also at the Old Vic, a staging of All My Sons opening the same month as Roundabout's will feature black actors in the roles of husband-and-wife Dr. Jim Bayliss and Sue.

"I wanted to be sure the concept held water historically and thematically," Miller told the Post, also expressing concerns that the particular casting "was in danger of white-washing the racism of 1947 suburban Ohio."

No word yet on any further casting for the production.

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